Designer Profile:
Deborah Ehrlich

BY: MICHAEL KOLODESH FEBRUARY 5TH, 2018

Deborah Ehrlich is a Hudson Valley–based designer best known for her fine crystal glassware and refined household essentials. Deborah designs pieces inspired by her daily life and home in New York’s serene Hudson Valley. “This area of the Hudson Valley is a fantastic combination of innate beauty and fundamental practicality,” Deborah says.

Deborah predominantly works with lead-free crystal glass, making it thinner, clearer, delicate and more flawless than traditional glass. Renowned for her work with this paper thin glass, people are drawn to the purity and delicacy of form created by Deborah. Her pieces are sculptural and elegantly graceful through their unadorned form. “The pursuit of what she terms 'quiet beauty' has defined the work of American designer Deborah Ehrlich ever since she began producing pieces in the late 1990s,” says Aaron Peasley in his Wallpaper article.

"Finding perfectly balanced proportion is like feeling in the dark for a door handle – when you come upon it, the emptiness becomes structured. It becomes clear that you are holding onto a much larger piece of architecture." -Deborah Ehrlich

Deborah is closely tied to her local Hudson Valley community which resulted in a collaboration with celebrated Hudson Valley restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills, New York. The serene surroundings & intimate details of the Hudson Valley inspire Deborah’s designs which she makes for her own home and collaborates with Swedish master craftsmen who hand blow the crystal for each order. “Deborah’s designs are not about building up, but about reducing. Paring them down to their most minimal, pure form, she pushes the envelope of what the materials can seemingly withstand,” says Justin Hand in a Remodelista Article.

“Finding perfectly balanced proportion is like feeling in the dark for a door handle – when you come upon it, the emptiness becomes structured. It becomes clear that you are holding onto a much larger piece of architecture,” says Deborah. In addition to her work in glass, Deborah recently returned to earlier experiments in wood; her handmade taking cues from architectural elements of her home such as the wide-planked floors, which were left unfinished except for a regular wash with Danish soap.

“The farmhouses, the farms, the old roads, the hardware store; the delicateness of the latch on the barn, the color of lime wash, the elegant proportions of the beams uncovered in the house. It’s not hard to pull those details into your own work,” says Deborah.

"The farmhouses, the farms, the old roads, the hardware store; the delicateness of the latch on the barn, the color of lime wash, the elegant proportions of the beams uncovered in the house. It’s not hard to pull those details into your own work." -Deborah Ehrlich